Making wine from a kit

1/29/2010 Finally getting around to making my wine. This is my cave in the basement where I do my Neanderthal think. I use two carboys one for primary fermentation and one for secondary fermentation. The blue band around the first carboy is a carboy heat tape and helps to maintain the wine at 75 deg f for ideal fermenting.

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Mt first batch will be Black Raspberry Merlot and when it is bottled, I will be making Green Apple Riesling. I should end up with nearly 60 750 ml bottles of premium wine for app. $2 per bottle.

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Each kit contains all the items to produce six gal of wine.

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01/30/2010 Here the primary fermentation is on the way and after the fermentation starts to slow I will bring the fluid level up to the bottom of the carboy neck. After five to seven days, I will rack the wine into the second carboy, leaving most of the sediment behind, to complete the fermentation.

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This is an air lock that sits on top of the carboy. It lets the CO2 escape and blocks any air from getting inside the carboy. I will update this post after each step in the process including the bottling. As usual all comments are welcome. John

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02/04/2010 The primary fermentation is complete and I have racked the wine into the second carboy. The second carboy has been placed back up on the bench with the air lock and heat tape installed. It will continue fermenting for another ten days before the stabilizing and fining. As usual all comments are welcome. John
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Categories: Home Made Wine | Tags: | 7 Comments

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7 thoughts on “Making wine from a kit

  1. Goodness, John! Don’t tell me you’re giving up on the BM’s. I think I’ll cry. Wine, however, is a good standby for those emergency ‘I’m out of vodka’ days. I’m excited to see how it goes.

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  2. ribbit these are both dinner wines one red and one white. I am having a BM as I type. ;o) John

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  3. Looks good John. I have not tried making wine but would like to at some point this year. So far I have done a hard cider and a beer. I have supplies for one more beer that I will be brewing soon. Certainly brings the cost down substantially.

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  4. Oh John, you are a winemaker as well!! How cool! I also make several wine kits per year, usually Winexpert Vinters Reserve. I am waiting until it warms a bit before starting my next batch. Perhaps I should look into the heat tapes for my carboys.

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  5. Looks good John. I have not tried making wine but would like to at some point this year. So far I have done a hard cider and a beer. I have supplies for one more beer that I will be brewing soon. Certainly brings the cost down substantially.

    Thanks Dan, I use to make beer years ago but migrated to wine making. You need a good wine to go with the great looking food that you make. John

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  6. Oh John, you are a winemaker as well!! How cool! I also make several wine kits per year, usually Winexpert Vinters Reserve. I am waiting until it warms a bit before starting my next batch. Perhaps I should look into the heat tapes for my carboys.

    The Island Mist is made by Winexpert also. I usually make the Vinters Reserve but decided to give the IM a try. I will let you know how it turns out. It is pretty cool in my basement now but the heat tape works great. John

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  7. Interesting – so that makes two of us that make wine then! I completed a large blog entry with updates almost daily on my blog as well.

    I opt to go for the grape juice that you can purchase at any supermarket. I spend about $25 to get five-gallons worth of grape juice.

    I used the Premier Cuvee yeast in this past batch and the taste seems different than the first batch I made last year using Montrachet. Both batches are around 13% alcohol, but this previous batch seems to have a little bit of a metallic taste to it.

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